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Art 2030 Takes Activist Stand Alongside United Nations in New York

By Claire Selvin and Andy Battaglia

October 5, 2018

“If we discuss, we reflect—and when we reflect, we take a stand.” So goes an impassioned refrain favored by Luise Faurschou, the founder and director of the Copenhagen-based activist organization Art 2030.

The main focus of her reflection is a set of 17 internationally aligned Sustainable Development Goals established by the United Nations in 2015 with an aim toward various forms of implementation by the year 2030. As presented on the UN’s website, the goals provide a “blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate, environmental degradation, prosperity, and peace and justice.”

Faurschou, who ran a namesake gallery for more than 20 years and after that a foundation and a curatorial/advisory enterprise called Faurschou Art Resources, established Art 2030 last year to try to forge links between the realms of art and policy. “I can connect the art world to this agenda,” she told ARTnews while in New York last week, “out of a deep belief that art is such a unique space for discussion.”

Read the full article here.

Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen & ART 2030, Tow with the Flow, New Design High School, New York, 2018. Lees Foto. Courtesy of Art 2030.

Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen & ART 2030, Tow with the Flow, New Design High School, New York, 2018. Lees Foto. Courtesy of Art 2030.

“If we discuss, we reflect—and when we reflect, we take a stand.” So goes an impassioned refrain favored by Luise Faurschou, the founder and director of the Copenhagen-based activist organization Art 2030.

The main focus of her reflection is a set of 17 internationally aligned Sustainable Development Goals established by the United Nations in 2015 with an aim toward various forms of implementation by the year 2030. As presented on the UN’s website, the goals provide a “blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate, environmental degradation, prosperity, and peace and justice.”

Faurschou, who ran a namesake gallery for more than 20 years and after that a foundation and a curatorial/advisory enterprise called Faurschou Art Resources, established Art 2030 last year to try to forge links between the realms of art and policy. “I can connect the art world to this agenda,” she told ARTnews while in New York last week, “out of a deep belief that art is such a unique space for discussion.”

Read the full article here.